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A pint of beer, but which one? Ireland’s debate rages on.

Murphy's beer ad in Cork, Ireland

I don’t know if you knew this, but Ireland has a lot of places to drink.  “Pubs.”  That’s the street name for these places to drink.  Inside these “pubs,” you can get some fine beers on tap.  (Side note: You don’t tip bartenders in Ireland, just one more example of Irish hospitality.  I left a tip on the bar, and the bartender actually pushed it towards me and said I paid too much.  This gesture would not happen in LA, where bartenders charge you a dollar for filling up a glass with tap water.)  So in Ireland, there’s this kind of beer that seems to be pretty popular.  It’s called “Guinness.”  I’m sure they’ll start exporting it to the rest of the world soon.

Kinsale Pub Ad for Guinness

But there’s a bit of a rivalry going on when it comes to which beer to drink in Ireland.  Guinness seems to be the official beer brand of Dublin, but for Cork, they have their own favorite.  It’s called Murphy’s.  Both are dark stouts, but they each have their own flavor.  Now I have to say, I’ve tried both, and it’s not just because I liked Cork better than Dublin, but I preferred Murphy’s.  It’s not as bitter as Guinness, and it’s a little lighter in body.  Does that make me less of a man, that I prefer the lighter, sweeter beer?  Some might say yes.  “Ooh, little American boy can’t handle the strength of Guinness.  He can’t withstand something that tastes like you’re drinking a loaf of bread.”  Well guess what?  I usually don’t even drink beer.  I’m a wine guy.  Yeah, wine.  Cheese plate-nibbling, cardigan sweater-wearing wine.  People should be grateful I was even drinking beer.  So there.  Now if you’ll excuse me, I have to work out on the low impact elliptical machine at my local gymnasium.

30
Aug 2011
POSTED BY travelbugrobert
POSTED IN

Cities, Cork, Dublin, Europe, Food, Ireland

DISCUSSION No Comments
Video

Cork Butter Museum

Museum curators rarely base exhibitions solely around dairy products, which makes the Cork Butter Museum unique, ’cause everything is about butter. The museum follows the history of butter in Cork, from the days of Irish kings to preindustrial manufacturing to the 20th Century when dairy farmers had to market their product to the world in the changing global economy. Learning about Cork’s butter history provides a wonderfully unusual approach into learning about the entire history of Cork. The only downside: no butter samples.

07
Jul 2010
POSTED BY travelbugrobert
DISCUSSION No Comments
Video

Cork, Ireland

It may not be as large as Dublin, but despite its size, Cork has plenty to see. Blarney Castle, the English Market, St. Anne’s Church, the Butter Museum, and the nearby town of Kinsale will keep you busy sightseeing for days.

30
Jun 2010
POSTED BY travelbugrobert
DISCUSSION 1 Comment
Video

Cork Food: whoever that shepard is can make one fine pie

Cork has many more food options than authentic Irish fare. Sure, you can get a Shepard’s Pie or Fish and Chips in lot of restaurants, but they have kebab joints and progressive, UC Berkley-type eateries, too. Cork lives up to its urban surroundings. With different cultures melding within the same city, food options are varied, too.

23
Jun 2010
POSTED BY travelbugrobert
DISCUSSION 3 Comments
Video

Blarney Castle: it’s more than a stone

Blarney Castle is just outside Cork, Ireland. This is the place to go if you want to kiss the Blarney Stone, but this place is much more than just the Blarney Stone. Sure, the top reason people visit this attraction is to kiss the Blarney stone, but there’s Blarney Castle itself, which is pretty cool, and acres of lovely grounds surrounding the castle. Rock Close is especially interesting to explore. Make a day of it on your vacation (or holiday, as the Irish would say) and picnic in the outdoors. You won’t be disappointed.

16
Jun 2010
POSTED BY travelbugrobert
DISCUSSION No Comments